Undergraduate Concentrations

The Biological Sciences Department offers five concentration areas for undergraduates, each targeted to a different career path. Scroll down to browse through our concentrations or use the skip links to jump straight to a concentration's description.

Concentrations

Anatomy and Physiology
Ecology, Evolution, Biodiversity, and Conservation
Molecular & Cellular Biology

General Curriculum Biology

 

Anatomy classroom

Anatomy and Physiology

Students in this concentration study biological sciences with an emphasis on the structure and function of humans and other animals.  This concentration is ideal for students preparing for careers in the health professions.

 

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Class in Coastal Hills

Ecology, Evolution, Biodiversity, and Conservation

This concentration will prepare students to study the ecology and evolution of the earth's biodiversity and to participate in its conservation. The concentration will provide students with the skills necessary to participate in the conservation of wildlife, plants, and other wild species and their habitats. Professions in this arena include basic and applied research with state and federal resource management agencies, non-governmental organizations (N.G.O.s), and private consulting firms. These professions require a solid foundation in the identification of organisms, the principles of ecology and evolution, and the tools, policies and social context of conservation. This area of concentration is recommended for students seeking professional certification by off-campus entities such as The Wildlife Society and the Ecological Society of America; students interested in such certification programs should consult with their faculty advisor for specific programmatic guidance.

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Student with culture dish

Molecular and Cellular Biology

Designed for students who are interested in how genes and their products work to create and maintain cells, tissues and organisms.  This concentration augments the diverse biological sciences curriculum with laboratory courses in nucleic acid and protein techniques, along with cell biology, biochemistry, and electives such as bioinformatics, microbial biotechnology, immunology, developmental biology and virology. This concentration is ideal for students interested in biotechnology or biomedical research, and is also an excellent option for students planning future studies in the health professions.

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Student with culture dish

General Curriculum in Biology

General Curriculum in Biology is not a concentration but can be used to fulfill the unit requirements of a concentration. The General Curriculum provides the greatest flexibility allowing students to take coursework across all areas of biology. This breadth of knowledge across the biological sciences may be especially beneficial for students considering teaching biology at the secondary level. Students who do not declare a concentration will default to the General Curriculum.

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